Laure Permon, duchesse d'ABRANTÈS (1784-1838) écrivain, auteur de Mémoires, veuve du général Junot, maîtresse de plusieurs écrivains romantiques

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Laure Permon, duchesse d'ABRANTÈS (1784-1838) écrivain, auteur de Mémoires, veuve du général Junot, maîtresse de plusieurs écrivains romantiques

L.A.,[circa 832]; 8 pages in-8 (freckles).
Long letter talking about Alexandre Dumas and Victor Hugo.
She talks about her work of proofreading for her Memoirs, then thanks her for the proposal to invite her sons to Alexandre Dumas' house. "Although it was tremendously hurtful to me to say that I had an office of mind"; Dumas "is of course to be listened to when he speaks... That evening Mr. Dumas spoke for three hours against this poor Mr. Drouineau, to whom he cut off the floor with every word.
Mr. Dumas was even hurtful several times in the discussion. I listened for a long time but I must admit that since my childhood I have been used to hearing notabilities from all eras, there was not enough in what I heard to make me abandon my whole world. I had seen at home the day before[...] for two hours, my literary hero, the one whose name I bear because I am enthusiastic about him is Victor Hugo, and certainly after him you have to put cotton in his ears. And then came the conversation about Gaillardet[the author of the Tour de Nesle]-Frédéric Gaillardet is one of my friends. So I had to do the duties of a friend and not suffer that he was horribly insulted in my living room. If they said a word against you, it would be the same thing. I am a man by character and especially in there you need security & trust. That's where I am with
Alexandre Dumas. He was wrong because a bad language was reported the next morning to Gaillard and Dumas' comments. All this has made an unworthy mess. Mr. Dumas should have made the distinction between all this.
He didn't do it. All this is from a man who had something to blush about when he saw in his memory the ridiculousness and even the inconvenience of calling a good boy, funny and rascal"... Gaillardet, who had come to her home, was desperate: "I denied by raising my hand that the thing was there", and Dumas is naturally excluded from her home, unless he apologizes or repairs his carelessness.
He has a remarkable talent, but he "is not the Saint
Peter having the keys to paradise from which the genius must escape"... Fortunately, the next day she received from Victor Hugo "a letter in which there is at the same time a heart, a genius who dresses himself in every word of him, and a flower of politeness that I will never suffer if it is said that he is devoid"...
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